Documentation for PISM, the Parallel Ice Sheet Model

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applications:201608 [2016/08/17 17:19] (current)
Ed Bueler created by copy of future_applications:201608, with edits
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 +====== August 2016 ======
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 +[[http://​www.the-cryosphere.net/​10/​639/​2016/​|{{:​applications:​pittardetal2016.png?​300|}}]]
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 +| **[[http://​dx.doi.org/​10.1002/​2016GL068436|Organization of ice flow by localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux]]** ||
 +| **investigators**:​ | [[http://​www.utas.edu.au/​geophysics|M. L. Pittard]], B. K. Galton-Fenzi,​ J. L. Roberts, C. S. Watson|
 +| **journal**:​ | [[http://​agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/​agu/​journal/​10.1002/​(ISSN)1944-8007/​|Geophysical Research Letters]] |
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 +Geothermal flux is one input to a thermo-mechanically coupled ice flow model such as PISM, with significant impact on both ice softness and basal lubrication. ​ Maps of geothermal flux under present-day ice sheets come from nontrivial geophysical inversions, based on seismic and/or magnetic observations,​ which generate non-unique and (inevitably) smoothed maps.  For example, solutions by Shapiro & Fitzwoller (2004) and Fox Maule et al (2005) are familiar to Antarctic ice sheet modelers. ​ However, measurements on ice-free continents show geothermal flux has strong spatial variations including concentrated highs (hot spots).
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 +A model like PISM can, at least, demonstrate the effects on ice flow of small-spatial-scale variations in geothermal flux.  This paper studies the Lambert-Amery glacial system in East Antarctica, where a variety of evidence indicates high heat flux regions of at least 120 mW per square meter. ​ Localized regions of elevated geothermal flux are tested in PISM simulations. ​ The results show significant effects on slow-moving ice, with influence extending both upstream and downstream of the geothermal anomaly. ​ Fast-moving ice is relatively unaffected. ​ This contrast suggests that the effect of geothermal flux on ice softness may dominate the lubrication effect.
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applications/201608.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/08/17 17:19 by Ed Bueler
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