Documentation for PISM, the Parallel Ice Sheet Model

NEWS: PISM version 1.1

PISM

olympics-crop.jpg

Modeled ice flow speed on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington state, USA, for conditions near the LGM.

The Parallel Ice Sheet Model PISM v1.1 is open source and capable of high resolution. It has been widely adopted as a tool for doing science.

Features include:

Latest News

LARMIP

LARMIP is the Linear Antarctic Response to basal melting Model Intercomparison Project. PISM is one of several participating models. The goal is to use the newest models to compute a linear-response sea level contribution to inform the IPCC-AR6. Find all necessary materials at www.pik-potsdam.de/larmip.

2017/11/26 19:56 · Ed Bueler

PhD opportunity in ice-ocean interaction (modeling)

The Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks is seeking a PhD student for the recently funded NSF project “Understanding the controls on spatial and temporal variability in ice discharge using a Greenland-wide ice sheet model”. The overall goal of this project is to develop novel parameterizations of ice-ocean interaction that are suitable for large scale ice-sheet modeling. The interdisciplinary project is co-led by Andy Aschwanden (UAF; ice sheet modeling) and Patrick Heimbach (U Texas at Austin, ocean modeling) and comprises two PhD positions, one focussing on the ocean side (see separate announcement) and the other on the ice sheet side (this posting). The student here at UAF will implement and test parameterizations within the framework of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) but will closely collaborate with U Texas, including mutual visits.

We seek motivated candidates with a degree (preferably a M.Sc. or equivalent) in geosciences, physics, mathematics, engineering or related fields. Basic experience in numerical modeling, good oral and written communication skills are a prerequisite.

For more information, please contact Andy Aschwanden (aaschwanden@alaska.edu).

2017/11/21 09:32 · Ed Bueler

Team

PISM is jointly developed at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). For more about the team see the UAF Developers and PIK Developers pages.

UAF developers, who are in the Glaciers Group at the GI, are supported by NASA's Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction and Cryospheric Sciences Programs (grants NAG5-11371, NNX09AJ38C, NNX13AM16G, NNX16AQ40G, NNX17AG65G) and by NSF grants PLR-1603799 and PLR-1644277.

home.txt · Last modified: 2018/12/10 12:17 by Ed Bueler
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