Documentation for PISM, a parallel Ice Sheet Model

NEWS: EGU Early Career Award for PISM-author Ricarda Winkelmann

The Parallel Ice Sheet Model pism0.7 is open source and capable of high resolution. It is widely adopted as a tool for doing science. Features include:

PISM Application of the Month

May 2017

Sometimes what you need from an ice sheet model is a context for your measurements. In this paper ice microstructure (crystal orientation, grain size/shape), visual stratigraphy, and borehole tilt were measured in the EDML core drilled in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Microstructures reflect the dynamic conditions of the location as well as its thermodynamic history, and determine rheological effects. PISM was used to generate the flow field and temperatures at depth at the ice core site from the large-scale geometry of the ice sheet and surface inputs. The details of structural observations were evaluated using principal strain rates from PISM, with comparison to with borehole logging data. This comparison confirms the division of the core into five depth regions (figure) and in turn provides a wider view of the ice sheet.

2017/05/10 12:34 · Ed Bueler

Latest News

EGU Early Career Award for PISM-author Ricarda Winkelmann

Congratulations to Ricarda Winkelmann of the University of Potsdam for receiving the EGU's Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award in Cryospheric Sciences. Her involvement with ice sheet modeling started with a very cold trip to Fairbanks Alaska in November 2008, leading to a 2011 paper on the design of PISM-PIK which is one of the most-cited PISM papers. (PISM-PIK introduced new features for marine ice sheets which were merged into PISM itself a few years later.) The EGU citation on her work, which has mostly been on the impact of large ice masses on global sea level change, says her papers are a “testament to her exceptional clarity of thought and physical insight.” Find “Winkelmann” in the publications page for examples.

2017/04/27 13:25 · Ed Bueler

New PISM user help email: uaf-pism@alaska.edu

The core team at UAF continues to support PISM users. The new email for help is uaf-pism@alaska.edu; it replaces help@pism-docs.org. As before, email to this address will be distributed to all the UAF developers, and so it will get the most prompt response year-round.

2017/02/21 20:47 · Ed Bueler

Study of Juneau Ice Field in Cambridge Core news

A recent PISM application Ziemen et al (2016) is covered by a news item in Cambridge Core news.

The 4000 square km ice field in Southeast Alaska is well-known and accessible since its outlets are in the suburbs of the Alaska state capital, Juneau. But climate data for the area are sparse.

Those model runs that agreed well with observations for 1971 to 2010 generated volume and area losses of more than half by 2099. While co-author Regine Hock (UAF) is quoted as saying “The massive icefield that feeds Alaska’s Mendenhall Glacier may be gone by 2200 if warming trend predictions hold true,”, the authors emphasize that spatially-distributed mass balance measurements and improved climate projections that resolve the local temperature and precipitation patterns are essential to solidifying these predictions.

2016/10/06 14:26 · Ed Bueler

PISM team

PISM is jointly developed at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). For more about the team see the UAF Developers and PIK Developers pages.

UAF developers, who are in the Glaciers Group at the GI, are supported by NASA's Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction and Cryospheric Sciences Programs (grants NAG5-11371, NNX09AJ38C, NNX13AM16G, NNX16AQ40G, NNX17AG65G) and by NSF grants PLR-1603799 and PLR-1644277.

home.txt · Last modified: 2017/04/27 13:26 by Ed Bueler
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